Friday, July 29, 2022

Trucks That Trouble-shoot Themselves, Get Ready, They're Coming!

In the future, equipment is expected to troubleshoot itself 
without human intervention.

iStock_Bombaert818

Thanks to advances in technology, as well as an increasing emphasis on operations efficiency and wise resource use, the role of equipment fleet managers across all industries has changed quite a bit in recent years.

Expect even more changes in the future, says Jim Schug, a principal and engagement manager for FMI Corporation.

Schug, who is also a certified equipment manager and the program lead for the Certification Institute, cites “adapting to technology, innovation, and the new workforce” as three big changes that have occurred in fleet management over the last few years. All fleet management professionals — no matter their industry or the type of equipment managed — need to prepare themselves for more changes on the horizon, he says.

“All vehicles are adapting across the industry,” says Schug, who participated in a panel discussion at ConExpo-Con/Agg in Las Vegas this March on the future of equipment management.

Jim Schug
“We likely are not far from vehicles that troubleshoot themselves, remote sensors that predict what to repair based on the data they collect, and an overall expectation of zero unplanned downtime.” Jim Schug, principal and engagement manager, FMI Corporation headquartered in Raleigh, N.C. and has offices in Denver, Tampa, Phoenix and Houston. “In the future, trucks will be connected and serve as a tracking center; and they will likely evolve out of needing field repairs and emergency calls.”

Need to adapt to changes
Given this move toward automation and advanced technology, fleet equipment — including service trucks —will become much more sophisticated and provide “near perfect information” on how they operate, he predicts. Therefore, he says, companies will only remain competitive in the future if they can do the following: have the best, most “fit” equipment to perform the job; eliminate equipment downtime; and demonstrate the ability to sustain ongoing operations 24 hours a day, seven days a week. And much of this will rest on the shoulders of fleet management leadership and their ability to adapt to industry changes, Schug argues.

“This future is a big shift from where we are today and puts more pressure on the equipment manager to lead what happens in the field, so the intensity and importance of the role increases,” says Schug, who has a bachelor of science degree in quantitative economics from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and a master of science in engineering management from the University of Missouri. “If equipment managers are not already sitting at the leadership table today they should be … and I certainly believe they will be in five years.”

Whether playing catch-up or preparing for more changes, fleet managers should take proactive steps to better position themselves (and their companies) for what lies ahead, he says.

“Learn how to collect data and enter it into an efficient system that helps inform when making difficult decisions,” says Schug, who acknowledges many people already use maintenance management systems in their decision-making.

However, he advises fleet managers to think beyond simply collecting and entering data. On that note, he emphasizes how the gathering, harvesting and analyzing of data by fleet managers can help their CEOs make good decisions.

Recognize data’s value
“You need to recognize how valuable that data is to your lifecycle costs and current operations. Equipment data will drive operations in the future,” says Schug, whose company provides management consulting and investment banking services to various industries including construction and engineering.

Given the importance of data in fleet management, Schug says it is critical for fleet managers to “stay engaged” and “plugged-in” when it comes to industry associations and vendors. By doing so, fleet managers can keep abreast of new technologies, products and/or practices, all of which can benefit their overall fleet management efforts.

“You do not want your firm to fall behind the innovation curve. At the same time, we are seeing strategy evolve from a ‘gut feel’ to a more data-driven approach,” Schug says.

According to Schug, though, a data-driven strategy in fleet management is more of a “shared understanding” developed and refined through the experiences of employees serving customers in the field.

“CEOs seldom innovate effectively,” Schug says. “The field and front-line management is the source of all great innovations; and they will be what leads our industry forward. Great firms recognize this and harness it in the development and execution of their strategy.”

Mark Yontz is a freelance writer from Urbandale, Iowa.

Source: http://www.servicetruckmagazine.com/get-ready-for-future-trucks-that-trouble-shoot-themselves/


Thursday, July 28, 2022

Old Car vs Modern Car during Crash Test / Evolution of Car Safety



The first models and designs for automobiles were created in the 15th century by none other than Leonardo da Vinci, and the state of the global auto industry has evolved significantly since. First steam, to electric, gasoline, and today’s hybrids, the evolution of safety features in cars plays an essential role in reducing the once overwhelming number of injuries and damages resulting from auto accidents. Auto manufacturers have come a long way over the history of auto safety, paving the way for improved global safety standards.

Unfortunately, as a vehicle ages, a number of factors come into play that reduce the automobiles safety, aside from mechanical wear and tear. According to statistics, a driver is 10 times as likely to suffer fatal injuries in a collision while operating a 30-year-old vehicle versus a late model. The auto industry is continually working to improve the safety of current mechanisms, as well as developing and testing new ideas for safer vehicles. Developments in driving technology and new types of airbags have been prevalent just this year.

While the ultimate safe vehicle may be a long way off, American auto manufacturers have made significant strides in improving the overall security and protection a vehicles structure provides. Over the past 3 decades, fatal accidents in the U.S. have decreased by more than 1/5, a substantial decrease demonstrating immense progress in terms of the safety features in cars.

The need to revolutionize auto safety was not fully realized until the 1950s, when the first usable airbags were developed, among other safety mechanisms. Then, in 1970, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) was created. The organization still uses the same name today, and continues its role in promoting and effectively executing driving safety regulations throughout the U.S. Whether creating new policies or revising existing regulations (at the state and federal level), the NHTSA and the United States have been true catalysts in the history of car safety.

Sunday, July 24, 2022

Enoven Landscape Dumps - Many Choices

 




Enoven Work Platform – Landscape Dump Bodies

Available: 9′, 10′, 12′, 14′, 16′

Includes removable or fixed sides and Barn doors in the rear.

Also available with load divider gate as shown in the first photo.

See more at Enoven.com

Friday, July 22, 2022

Taylor Pump and Lift Portable Lube Skid


Sam with Up Truck Fleet Center shows off the portable lube skid from Taylor Pump and Lift.  It can be loaded into a pickup, service body, or trailer.  See more at UpTruck.com Also available at Enoven.com

Tuesday, July 19, 2022

The All-Electric 2022 Ford E-Transit™ Is Ready | Ford Pro™​


Our all-electric 2022 Ford E-Transit™ van is ready for the challenges your business takes on. Available with Ford Pro™ E-Telematics,* where you can monitor things like range and help maximize run times, along with upfitting configurations based on your business needs, the E-Transit will be the workhorse of your fleet. So let Ford Pro electrify your fleet- giving you the ability to focus on the work that matters most. Ford Pro. A productivity accelerator for your business. *Eligible vehicles receive a complimentary 3-year trial of E-Telematics services that begins on the new vehicle warranty start date. Requires modem activation. Terms and conditions apply. Telematics service and features, and access to vehicle data depend on compatible AT&T network availability. Evolving technology/cellular networks/vehicle capability may limit functionality and prevent operation of connected features. After the 3- year trial, annual service contract is required for E-Telematics service. Call 1-833-811-3673 to activate E-Telematics service.

Monday, July 18, 2022

Ask An Expert - Towing and Hauling Tips with Mark Hellwig


Hellwig Suspension Products CEO, Mark Hellwig has been in the load and sway control business his whole life. Over the years he has learned a few things about towing and hauling.

Mark shares a few tips and pieces of advice for proper and safe towing and hauling in this video.

Friday, July 15, 2022

What If You Forget To Change Your Oil?


What if you forget to change your oil on time? Can you damage your car's engine by not changing the oil late? Do you really need to change your oil every 3,000 miles? Obviously, you should change your oil regularly, but exactly how much damage you will cause by changing the oil late? This video looks to answer this question. We'll discuss what happens to oil viscosity as it ages, and what happens to oil additives in over time.

Thursday, July 14, 2022

FORD DEALERS NOW HAVE ACCESS TO REMOTE-ASSISTANCE TECHNOLOGY TO HELP GET CUSTOMERS BACK ON THE ROAD QUICKER


  • Two-way, hands-free electronic headset provides real-time visual and audio communication between dealership technicians and team members at the Ford Technical Assistance Center in Dearborn, allowing for more efficient diagnoses
  • Technology uses remote assistance software powered by augmented reality, which allows team members at the Technical Assistance Center to display modified or enhanced images to the dealer technician through the headset
  • SWIS is a global program and currently being used in Canada, South Africa, UK, Puerto Rico, Taiwan, and Australia

DEARBORN, Mich., June 27, 2022 – Ford dealerships across the country now have access to state-of-the-art remote viewing technology allowing them to receive real-time assistance for customer repairs from team members at the Ford Technical Assistance Center (TAC) in Dearborn.

“The remote technology is designed to assist the technicians as they’re working on vehicles – with the goal of increasing efficiency and decreasing down time for customers,” says David Green, Ford General Service Equipment Program Specialist. “This technology modernizes and simplifies our operations, benefiting everyone involved.”

The two-way, hands-free electronic headset, known as See What I See (SWIS), allows for both visual and audio communication between the dealership technicians and team members at the Technical Assistance Center.

The technology uses remote assistance software allows the technical assistance team to see what the dealership tech is seeing while they work on the vehicle in real time. SWIS’s augmented reality capability allows TAC team members to display modified or enhanced images on the headset for the dealer technicians to view.

According to Green, “We had one case where a technician reported the vehicle would not recognize the low tire pressure sensors. When the tech contacted the Hotline using SWIS, they quickly found out they were using the wrong tool when they tech held it up in front of the camera. Once the right tool was used, everything was programmed just the way it should.”

At the TAC headquarters, a team of about 150 technicians receives about 5,000 calls from dealership technicians across the U.S. each week looking for support or answers regarding a variety of issues. Of those, about 200 cannot be diagnosed by phone; field agents must be sent out to check out the issue in person.

“SWIS definitely helps get our customers back on the road more quickly. We’ve had some wiring situations that we were able to fix in a few hours versus a few days using See What I See and that’s really valuable,” says Susan Padro, Service Manager at Mullinax Ford in Apopka Florida.

Ford has activated 1200 of the headsets so far with more than 350 SWIS calls to TAC in the last 90 days. All US-based dealers should have SWIS in their toolbox by November of this year.

Currently, SWIS is for diagnostic assistance, but designers are working to enhance the headsets to add more specific use cases such as H-VAC concerns. Other uses cases include gaining prior approval before replacing a windshield by sending pictures of the defect instantly. Fleets are looking to leverage the headset to assist a technician on site with certain electric vehicle repairs instead sending an engineer allowing for faster repairs and savings on travel costs. Mobile service teams are also looking at using SWIS to remote in from someone’s driveway where they are performing a service like tire changes. Training remotely using the headset between an instructor and a student is another valuable use case to avoid having to attend a distant training center.  

About Ford Motor Company

Ford Motor Company (NYSE: F) is a global company based in Dearborn, Michigan, that is committed to helping build a better world, where every person is free to move and pursue their dreams. The company’s Ford+ plan for growth and value creation combines existing strengths, new capabilities and always-on relationships with customers to enrich experiences for and deepen the loyalty of those customers. Ford develops and delivers innovative, must-have Ford trucks, sport utility vehicles, commercial vans and cars and Lincoln luxury vehicles, as well as connected services. Additionally, Ford is establishing leadership positions in mobility solutions, including self-driving technology, and provides financial services through Ford Motor Credit Company. Ford employs about 182,000 people worldwide. More information about the company, its products and Ford Credit is available at corporate.ford.com.

Sunday, July 10, 2022

Driving Tips for Wet Roads


Wet pavement contributes to over 1 million crashes each year! Here are AAA's tips if you're caught driving in the rain. www.aaa.com/safety


Friday, July 8, 2022

WARN New Products Video


Warn Industries has released a host of new product in time for the 2020 SEMA360 show. Have a look at our latest items that let you GOPREPARED for any situation. This includes - WARN HUB Receiver & App - WARN Epic Wheels - Elite Front and Rear Bumpers for Wrangler/Gladiator - The Ascent Family of bumpers including Ascent HD, Ascent XP, Ascent, and Ascent Rear Bumpers - New Trans4mer Gen III applications - New WARN Semi-Hidden Kit applications - Series G2 Industrial Winches - AXON and VRX powersports winches More at http://warn.com

Wednesday, July 6, 2022

Introducing the 2023 Ford F-150® Heritage Edition | F-150 | Ford


We’re marking the 75th anniversary of F-Series with the 2023 F-150 Heritage Edition, a modern take on the iconic two-tone pickup. Coming this fall.* *Order banks will open in mid-July. Production starts fall 2022. Learn more about the Ford F-150 here: https://ford.to/3u3H0FF

Monday, July 4, 2022

How V8 Engines Work - A Simple Explanation


V8 engines operates under the same basic principles as any other gasoline four-stroke engine. First the piston pulls in air and fuel as it moves downward, then it compresses that air and fuel as the piston moves upward. A spark plug fires, igniting the air/fuel mixture and forcing the piston downward. Finally the piston pushes out the exhaust gases on its way back up, before for the cycle repeats itself.

In a V8 engine, this cycle is happening in 8 different cylinders, at different times. Instead of multiple cylinders firing at the same time, you want them to be spread out so that power delivery is smooth. For this Chevy V8, the firing or is 1, 8, 7, 2, 6, 5, 4, 3. With 8 cylinders, there is a cylinder firing for every 90 degrees of the crankshaft rotating, which means at any point in time, there are two cylinders on the power stroke.

With regards to the valvetrain, the intake air comes from the top of the engine, and into the sides of the cylinder head. The exhaust flows to the sides of the engine, exiting the exhaust valves from the cylinder head. In this LS3 model, there is a single intake valve and a single exhaust valve, though it’s also common to see engines with two intake valves and two exhaust valves. The larger valve is the intake valve, and the smaller valve is the exhaust valve.

The pushrod valvetrain gets its name from the metal pushrods which activate the rocker arms which open up the valves. The camshaft, located in the center of the V, has lobes on it which push the push rods up, opening the appropriate valves. For a full explanation of V8 engines, check out the video!

Saturday, July 2, 2022

Assembly | Built for America | Ford


Welcome to the electric future of the Ford Motor Company. Built not for the few, but for the many. Learn more about how we’re building electric for America here: https://ford.to/34C7qnZ